“The Division Bell” (1994) by Pink Floyd.

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Album: The Division Bell
Artist: Pink Floyd
Released: March 28, 1994
Length: 66:23

The Division Bell is Pink Floyd’s fourteenth album, an underrated and overlooked masterpiece hidden in plain sight – or sound, to be technically correct. One of my favorite albums of any genre, this album is quite simply masterfully crafted, bringing together the chill, transcendental, psychedelic sound Pink Floyd is best known for, and the intense excitement of David Gilmour’s soulful guitar riffs, which give me goosebumps to this day to be honest, even after listening to the album countless times from beginning to end over many years. This classic was released on March 28th, 1994, almost exactly eight months before my birth. I think of this album as a comforting friend, providing a chill and relaxed atmosphere to zone into whenever I need a minute to breathe or think, or to simply be. It sure reminds me of many memories, mostly relaxed and peaceful, reflective ones.

I remember I would often lay down in bed, face up, hands behind my head, after a tired day’s work, The Division Bell slowly beginning to play on the speakers, starting with the soft, soothing piano sounds of the intro track ‘Cluster One’, easing my mind into an almost hypnotic, half awake, half asleep state, a sensation so similar to the beginning of a vivid lucid dream. The guitar which emerges so gracefully from the background creates a chill as I begin to drift. I concentrate on the music until I wake up, not knowing the exact point I fully fell asleep. I usually wake up some hours later feeling delightfully and surprisingly refreshed. Talk about therapeutic music. ‘The Division Bell’ as a title is a reference to the bell which is rung in the British parliament when a vote is announced, and this symbolizes that the album has to do with the choices we make and the decisions which dictate the rest our lives.

After ‘Cluster One’, the introductory track, the album seems to abruptly change into a menacing, fiery tone on ‘What Do You Want from Me?’, the most upbeat and hard track on the album – lively, exciting, energetic, electric. ‘Poles Apart’ brings about a trippy, nostalgic feeling, as it should have, considering that it is written in reference to former bandmates Syd Barrett and Roger Waters. ‘Marooned’ is simply breathtakingly beautiful, and it must be listened to without any distractions around in order to fully appreciate the calmness it creates, especially being fully instrumental and melodic. ‘A Great Day for Freedom’ is great as well, ‘Wearing the Inside Out’ even greater, extremely euphoric is how I would explain it. ‘Take It Back’ and ‘Coming Back to Life’ are lively, catchy tracks, the latter starting out calmly with a sharp electric guitar cry, piercing through the serene silence. Then it progresses into something extraordinary, a truly pleasant experience.

‘Keep Talking’ is just epic, and carries a deep, meaningful message within its lyrics, while ‘Lost for Words’ is also a deep, progressive track but with a different feel, also really great. ‘High Hopes’ is the longest track on the album, the most progressive, gradually building up to perfection, beginning with the little tinkle of bells which echo in a melodic, mysterious tone. The album ends as an epic ensemble of instruments truly fit to be the finishing track for this fantastic album. In conclusion, The Division Bell is an overall masterpiece of classic rock, and a definite must-listen for any Pink Floyd fan, and for anyone who appreciates great music in general for that matter.

Enjoy this great album, let me know if take you listen!

~ REBEL SPIRIT ~

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